Research Impact and Value in LIS: introducing the RIVAL network

Hazel Hall

This afternoon I’m speaking at the Edge conference in Edinburgh about a new project, as summarised in the slide below.

RIVAL launch poster We started work on Research Impact and Value and LIS (RIVAL) on 1st February 2019. The Royal Society of Edinburgh has awarded us a grant to create a collaborative network of Scotland-based library and information science (LIS) researchers and library and information professionals interested in maximising the value of LIS research. This work builds on the pilot RIVAL event that we hosted at Edinburgh Napier University on 11th July last year.

We’re using the funding to organise four one-day network events between July 2019 and July 2020.  A proportion of this will be used to cover expenses of network members to participate at the events: travel for all members as required; travel and accommodation for those travelling long distances, e.g. from the Highlands and Islands. An extensive online presence…

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Practices of community representatives in exploiting information channels for citizen democratic engagement: paper available on OnlineFirst

Hazel Hall

File:Journal of Librarianship and Information Science.jpgThe first of the seven articles that I recently co-authored for the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS) has now been published as an OnlineFirst paper, with the option to download it as a PDF.

In the paper entitled ‘Practices of community representatives in exploiting information channels for citizen democratic engagement‘ my co-authors Peter Cruickshank and Bruce Ryan and I explore how elected (yet unpaid) community councillors in Scotland exploit information channels for democratic engagement with the citizens that they represent.

We demonstrate that community councillors engage with a range of information sources and tools in their work, the most important of which derives from local authorities. We highlight a number of ways in which community councillors could be better supported in their information use, and conclude with a set of recommendations that relate to (i) information literacy training; (ii) valuing information skills…

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Register for the next Open Knowledge Foundation Edinburgh meet-up: Monday 7th May, Edinburgh Napier Merchiston

Hazel Hall

OKFN 2018 logoRegistration is open for the next Open Knowledge Foundation (OKFN) Scotland meet-up which takes place on the evening of Monday 7th May at the Edinburgh Napier University Merchiston campus (room E17). Doors open 17:30, talks start 18:00, and the event is expected to finish around 20:00. The event is organised by Centre for Social Informatics colleagues Peter Cruickshank and Dr Bruce Ryan.

Open Knowledge meet-ups are friendly and informal gatherings for the discussion of open knowledge and open data. Topics range from politics and philosophy to the practicalities of theory and practice.

At the meeting on Monday 7th May there will be lightning talks from:

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DREaM paper accepted

In 2015, Bruce Ryan enjoyed working with Professor Hazel Hall on an assessment of the lasting effects of the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) project. Hazel’s posts about this project are here.

A paper written by Hazel, Peter Cruickshank and Bruce, addressing the question of network sustainability within a community of library and information science (LIS) researchers and practitioner researchers has now been accepted for publication in the Journal of Documentation. Please read more about it in Hazel’s blog post, or, if you would like to learn more about the results of this study, please email Hazel at: h.hall@napier.ac.uk.